We Disagree About This Tree: A Christmas Story (Ross Collins' Mouse and Bear Stories) (Hardcover)

We Disagree About This Tree: A Christmas Story (Ross Collins' Mouse and Bear Stories) By Ross Collins, Ross Collins (Illustrator) Cover Image

We Disagree About This Tree: A Christmas Story (Ross Collins' Mouse and Bear Stories) (Hardcover)

By Ross Collins, Ross Collins (Illustrator)

$16.99


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A festive follow-up to There's a Bear on My Chair and There’s a Mouse in My House

Bear and Mouse have finally overcome their differences and are living together in perfect harmony . . . until it’s time to decorate the Christmas tree! Bear wants dazzling lights, while Mouse prefers gigantic ornaments. Did Mouse just put a manatee on the top of the tree? After Bear attempts an upside-down tree, it looks as if Christmas might be ruined for the pair. But maybe, just maybe, Bear and Mouse can reach a compromise in the spirit of the season.
Ross Collins has illustrated more than one hundred books for children and is the author-illustrator of This Is a Dog, There’s a Bear on My Chair, There’s a Mouse in My House, This Zoo Is Not for You, and What Does an Anteater Eat? When he’s not creating children’s books, he enjoys working on character development for animation studios, including Laika and Disney. He also likes walking in the Scottish glens with his dog and his partner. Ross Collins lives in Scotland.
Product Details ISBN: 9781536231984
ISBN-10: 1536231983
Publisher: Candlewick Press
Publication Date: September 5th, 2023
Pages: 32
Language: English
Series: Ross Collins' Mouse and Bear Stories
The protagonists of There’s a Bear on My Chair (2016) and There’s a Mouse in My House (2021) disagree about how best to decorate their Christmas tree…until all nearly ends in disaster. . . . This silly story will elicit giggles from little readers. . . The length, pacing, and charming illustrations make this one a future Christmas favorite. . . . We agree: This is a delightful holiday tale.
—Kirkus Reviews

The funny rhyming text is all in dialogue, but it’s easy to see who’s speaking as the argument escalates: fonts are differentiated, and the digital illustrations make it clear who’s excited about each aesthetic and who’s decidedly not. All ends well, of course—but if these two ever try decking the halls, run.
—The Horn Book